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Family Holidays to Spain

Palm Court Apartments

Palm Court Apartments

Benidorm

Self Catering

Fri, 15 Dec 2017 for 7 Nights

From Manchester

From
£116 pp
Castillo Beach Park

Castillo Beach Park

Antigua - Spain

Room Only

Fri, 10 Nov 2017 for 7 Nights

From London Luton

From
£139 pp
Doramar

Doramar

Benalmadena

Room Only

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 for 4 Nights

From Exeter

From
£145 pp

Family Holidays to Portugal

Algarve Gardens

Algarve Gardens

Albufeira

Room Only

Thu, 01 Mar 2018 for 14 Nights

From Bristol

From
£117 pp
Clube Dos Arcos

Clube Dos Arcos

Portimao

Self Catering

Thu, 01 Mar 2018 for 14 Nights

From Bristol

From
£141 pp
Mirachoro II

Mirachoro II

PRAIA DA ROCHA

Self Catering

Thu, 01 Mar 2018 for 14 Nights

From Bristol

From
£143 pp

Family Holiday Deals to Turkey

Kaan Apart

Kaan Apart

Marmaris

Self Catering

Sat, 12 May 2018 for 7 Nights

From London

From
£145 pp
Club Ekinci Palace

Club Ekinci Palace

Icmeler

Self Catering

Sat, 12 May 2018 for 7 Nights

From London

From
£149 pp
Ekinci Palace

Ekinci Palace

Marmaris - Icmeler

Self Catering

Sat, 12 May 2018 for 7 Nights

From London

From
£151 pp

Family Holidays to Greece

Minas Apartments

Minas Apartments

Hersonissos

Room Only

Wed, 27 Jun 2018 for 7 Nights

From London

From
£163 pp
Jacks Apartments

Jacks Apartments

Kefalos

Room Only

Sun, 01 Jul 2018 for 7 Nights

From London

From
£252 pp
Rena Studios

Rena Studios

Lambi

Self Catering

Sun, 01 Jul 2018 for 7 Nights

From London

From
£253 pp

Recent Family Holiday Information and Recommendations

  • Take the kids to … Romney, Hythe and Dymchurch Railway

    This dream of a narrow-gauge railway and its one-third size trains make for a grand day out packing in great coastal views and fine fish and chips along the wayA 90-year-old narrow (15in) gauge steam and diesel railway stretching 14 miles from Hythe to Dungeness on the Channel coast. Everything’s on a titchy scale – from the platforms to the vintage wooden carriages – and wonderful wafts of soot pervade the route and its environs. My family has visited several times and the kids’ reaction when six and seven on arriving at Dymchurch station was always one of unalloyed joy. You may find some of that joy flattens out a bit after 20 minutes of trundling round the back of bungalows but you should enjoy peering into the shingly gardens with their bright blooms and the odd gnome. But great things await those who make it to the end of the line … Continue reading...

  • 10 of the best-value family ski trips

    Winter sports breaks can be seriously expensive during February half-term and the Easter holidays but there are bargains if you know where to lookAction Outdoors is the UK partner of UCPA, a French non-profit group that works to make outdoor sports holidays affordable. Its all-inclusive ski trips offer some of the best value going, with ski hire and 12 hours of tuition included in the price. Les Contamines, in the Mont Blanc region, is a friendly, quiet resort with higher than average snowfall that’s often overlooked in favour of big-hitting neighbours Chamonix and Megève. The slopes are especially suited to beginner and intermediate skiers, and the town is picturesque.• From £654pp at half-term (departing 10 February) with action-outdoors.co.uk, including 7 nights’ full-board, 6½ days’ lift pass, 12 hours’ ski instruction, 6½ days’ ski equipment hire and evening entertainment. Accommodation-only options are available and under-3s go free. Return Eurotunnel crossings from £150 per car. Tolls and fuel about £136 according to viamichelin.com Continue reading...

  • Take the kids to … the Mary Rose Museum, Portsmouth

    The Tudor warship that sank in the Solent in 1545 – and was raised 35 years ago today – is beautifully presented within its revamped setting and comes with fantastic artefacts and hands-on activitiesIn 1545 the Mary Rose, the pride of Henry VIII’s naval fleet, sank in the Solent during a battle with the French, with the loss of hundreds of men. Since her dramatic recovery 35 years ago – she was raised on 11 October 1982 in a £4m operation – the ship has mostly been shrouded in vapour and plastic pipes. But the latest incarnation of this brilliantly immersive museum, reopened in July 2016 after a multi-million pound investment, allows visitors to get closer to this Tudor warship than ever before. Related: Take the kids to … HMS Victory, Portsmouth Continue reading...

  • Smoke on the water: a boating holiday adventure in France

    On a family break along the Canal du Rhône au Rhin, Emma Cook and Co are out of their comfort zone, especially when their new boat breaks down. Still, there’s always Strasbourg to savourIt’s a beast of a boat, more Puerto Banús than Canal du Rhône, satin white curves and chrome handrails gleaming in the sun.And it’s ours for the week. This is Horizon, the shiniest and newest addition to the range by Le Boat, the canal boat specialist which offers self-drive craft along the waterways of mainland Europe, UK and Ireland.My six-year-old is entranced by two otters following the boat. There are moor hens, newts and dragonflies, tooJoy comes in the form of Strasbourg marina: we eat picnic lunches on deck and enjoy day trips into town by tram Continue reading...

  • Travels round Britain with dad

    Maddy Carr Rushby, 14, has been accompanying her dad on Guardian travel assignments since she was three. Here she chooses her top five UK activitiesI loved it when I was little and I still do. Basically, it’s a huge garden full of magical and weird experiences: water jets that shoot you, tunnels that whisper or get so narrow you have to squeeze through, underground rooms that revolve – it’s brilliant and they keep adding stuff.• Adult £12, 4-15 years £10, theforbiddencorner.co.uk Continue reading...

  • Top 10 UK mini-breaks with teenagers over October half-term

    It’s notoriously tricky keeping teens happy on holiday, so these breaks focus on their interests: music, gaming, sport, food and artSee our top 10 half-term breaks for younger kids Continue reading...

  • Top 10 UK mini-breaks with kids for October half-term

    From Bristol’s new Concorde museum to spotting Sumatran tigers in the Kent woods, young children will love these autumn breaks. We’ve added hostels and affordable hotels, too, to make them overnight getaways See our top half-term breaks for teenagers Continue reading...

  • The best family-friendly museums in the UK: readers’ travel tips

    Science, technology, art or history … readers recommend fun and educational museums around the country in time for half-termThe Thackray Medical Museum in Leeds does an incredible job of helping kids to understand how lucky they are to have vaccinations, antibiotics and even the basics, such as clean water. It’s a Victorian street complete with smells and printed cards (describing nasties like bed bugs), plus it highlights the horrors of cholera and there’s a chance to pick a character and see whether you survived or not. My 18-year-old daughter is adamant her love of science began there 10 years ago.• Adult £8, 5-16 years £5, family £24.50, thackraymedicalmuseum.co.uk kdee6969 Continue reading...

  • Horniman Museum plans major new gallery exploring 'what it means to be human'

    One of London’s most-treasured museums, the Horniman, is developing the World Gallery to showcase the way ‘people from every continent live their lives’South London’s much-loved Horniman Museum is planning to open a major new gallery that will showcase more than 3,000 objects from around the world.With a focus on “fascinating objects that tell extraordinary stories”, the 600-square-metre World Gallery will explore what it means to be human, celebrating “human creativity, imagination and adaptability.” It is due to open in June 2018. Continue reading...

  • ‘The myths and legends surrounding the South Downs are amazing’: writer Cressida Cowell

    The beauty and ancient history of the landscape have always fired the imagination of the How to Train Your Dragon authorI spent much of my childhood in the South Downs, where my grandmother lived, and we just ran free. We’d be off on our bikes, or on foot, – or toboggan in the snow – to explore the landscape around the villages of Singleton and Charlton which has, unconsciously, been such an inspiration to me as an author.There’s an extraordinary atmosphere here, I think because its human history is so old. There’s a feeling that you could turn round and someone from 2,000 years could appear. Paths like the South Downs Way have been trudged for thousands of years and probably haven’t changed much in that time. Continue reading...

  • Messing about in boats on Germany's lakes – and barely a tourist in sight

    The lakes of northern Germany are an idyllic setting for a watery adventure, but prove a stern test of Kevin Rushby’s boatmanship. Next destination: BambergWeek one | Week two| Week threeThe train south from the Baltic port of Stralsund first crosses rolling farmland, where the wheat is being harvested. In patches of grass I spot tall cranes busy hunting for frogs, fattening themselves up ready for migration. Summer is nearly over, the weather unpredictable – not perhaps the best moment to embark on a boat trip, but that is the plan. For the fourth stage of my journey around Germany, I will meet my family in Rheinsberg, 70km north of Berlin, then pick up a motorboat from nearby Wolfsbruch marina to explore the waterways of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, a vast area of more than 2,000 lakes connected by canals and rivers, and surrounded by forest. Continue reading...

  • Take the kids to … Stonehenge, Wiltshire

    This iconic site is a victim of its own fame and a cash cow for English Heritage – yet even the summer throngs can’t detract from the extraordinary romance of its unknowable pastThe world’s most famous prehistoric monument and one of the UK’s biggest tourist attractions, controversially roped off so visitors are not allowed within 10 metres of it – though it receives so many tourists (1,381,855 in 2016) that it would be virtually impossible to let them get closer. Continue reading...

  • Once upon a time in … Efteling theme park, the Netherlands

    The traditional, fairytale-themed amusement park features elves, trolls and talking parrots, and its woodland setting and new hotel make it ideal for a family holiday Walking along windy paths through the forest, I can hear faint screams in the distance. They aren’t the blood-curdling type, more screeches of fear mixed with delight, and offer the only clue that we are staying in one of the oldest amusement parks in the world.Efteling, near Tilburg in the south of the Netherlands, isn’t on the radar of most Brits, even though it’s just over an hour’s drive from Amsterdam or the Hook of Holland. This is a shame, as its old-fashioned allure, based on traditional Brothers Grimm fairytales, is a refreshing change from modern theme parks – and the natural landscape has a starring role, too. Continue reading...

  • Take the kids to ... The Ice Cream Farm, Chester

    The ice-cream is divine (and award-winning) at this free-to-enter attraction but costs add up paying for individual rides and the other food options aren’t so tastyThe Ice Cream Farm near Chester is a mini theme park aimed at primary school-age children. It’s free to get in and there’s no charge for a great ice-cream-inspired playground and an underwhelming farm with donkeys, pigs, goats and llamas. However, you have to pay for all of the other attractions individually, including mini JCB diggers, go-karts, a near-vertical slide, soft-play areas for toddlers and older children, and Honeycomb Canyon, an indoor sand and water play park – which claims to be Europe’s largest. Do book online in advance if your children have their heart set on the diggers: there was a three-hour waiting list when we arrived at noon during the summer holidays. The site underwent a £4m redevelopment two years ago, which has left the original farm unrecognisable, dismaying as many regulars as it delights. Continue reading...

  • Not horsing around: donkey trekking in rural France

    Accidental detours are embraced on a family break amid the Lot valley’s forests, abbeys and wildlife – all in the company of Lulu, their trusted donkey companionA riding holiday used to be my ultimate dream: for 30 horse-mad years, I stared out of car windows and imagined galloping across moors and fields, fast and free. But middle age and a bad fall have done their insidious work and while I still love horses, I can’t shake the feeling they can be too unpredictable to trust. Time to test a more sedate kind of equine holiday: donkey trekking in rural France, walking with, rather than riding on, the donkey.Pilgrims have used Pyrenean donkeys – strong, sure-footed and hardy – as pack animals for centuriesLulu's sure hooves pick an unerring path, easily managing the off-piste scrambles Continue reading...

  • Take the kids to … William’s Den, North Cave, East Yorkshire

    This slick new Yorkshire attraction mixes traditional indoor fun and games with zipwires and swings in the great outdoors. There really is something here for all agesA new addition to Yorkshire’s theme parks and attractions, William’s Den opened on 3 July. It combines an indoor play area where all the structures are made of wood and rope with a huge outdoor section that features zipwires, tyre swings and places to make your own den in. Indoors is a beautifully put-together complex of suspended rope tunnels and platforms, a vast hollow oak tree with various levels and climbing apparatus, a fireman’s pole, a rope-ball swing, a huge sandpit, a water system based on a stream running through a wood, and a chill-out area with bucket chairs and bean bags. Continue reading...

  • 10 of the best beach bars in Portugal

    With cold beer, caipirinhas and great seafood, these bars, from the Algarve up to Porto, are as hot, bright and breezy as the stunning Atlantic coastline itself • Best beach bars in France and Spain Continue reading...

  • French (almost) without tears: a summer school break in France

    Just when you thought school was out ... mum books a holiday with language lessons, in Morzine, and signs up for classes, tooIt’s perhaps not surprising that there wasn’t universal enthusiasm about a holiday at a French language school. I did my best to rebrand it as a French fun camp, but my attempts were met with weary cynicism by Rose, 13 – who wrote “Make escape plan” on her hand on the first day – and William, 11. “Why would anyone want to spend part of the summer holidays in a classroom?” they asked.To begin with, maintaining a front of unflinching good humour in the face of their gloom was hard work. Gradually, though, they were won over. I wouldn’t say they were exactly skipping to catch the morning bus to classes, but by the end of our stay they were certainly scowling a lot less. Continue reading...

  • Modern family: Greece with grown-up kids

    A decade after a first family holiday in Greece, Martin Love heads to Paxos – and finds it wonderfully unchangedThe five of us stretched out on yoga mats with our toes pointing towards the sea. Above us the breeze stirred the leaves of the ancient olive trees. “Eímai edó,” intoned Sophie. “In Greek that means, ‘I am here.’” She continued in her gentle voice. “I am here in Paxos. I have arrived. I have moored on this rock surrounded by sea …” Sophie was training to be a mindfulness teacher. When we lay down I’d have bet my favourite Speedos that we’d soon be in fits of laughter, but not one of us so much as sniggered. We lay in still, neat rows, like sardines, as her soothing words washed over us. After a while, Sophie brought us up from the depths. “I hope you are now at one with this island,” she said. We’d been on Paxos for less than half a day yet I had the giddy sensation I might just chuck it all in and stay here forever.You can’t fly to Paxos, you catch a ferry from Corfu, which has preserved the island from the excesses of mass tourism Continue reading...

  • 12 of the UK's best driving pitstops – readers’ travel tips

    Britain’s motorway service stations aren’t everyone’s cup of tea but there are great picnic spots, cafes, gardens and attractions just beyond the hard shoulderHeading up to Bristol from Plymouth on the A38 we broke our journey by heading into Dartmoor to Hound Tor (a short drive off the A38 from Ashburton) to explore the rocky landscape and the medieval ruins. In the car park was The Hound of the Basket Meals food stand, which serves crab sandwiches, homemade burgers and lots of tea varieties. The landscape around is gorgeous and it’s just half a mile up to the tor. We also walked down to the ruins. It was quiet and beautiful there, with lots of bracken, thorns and heather. It isn’t hard to access Hound Tor and it’s far preferable to a service stop – and cheaper too.katie banks Continue reading...

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